Fast Food and Low Wages: What’s it Got to do with Overpopulation?


work-fare2The recent fast-food wage strikes have been interesting to watch, but I don’t think that the fast-food workers will get what they want.  Chances are they’ll only get less.  The only question is how soon they’ll lose.

It’s easy to be unsympathetic to fast-food workers because their jobs are menial and require no experience.  These hurried and rushed people who build burgers, mix chocolate shakes, and pour 16+ ounce sugary beverages are most likely working the only job which is available to them.  Working in fast-food is probably the equivalent of soft-served mining.  Mentally and physically exhausting work, poor work conditions, and no benefits.  Among those workers who do receive more than 40 hours a week, they still don’t earn enough to live comfortably and most require public assistance programs.

I think that fast-food workers should be able to make a livable wage, even if that means the price of cheeseburgers goes up.  But, even this does not address the more serious part of the problem.  When the labor expenses hit a certain point, McDonald’s and Burger King aren’t going to renegotiate for lower pay– they’ll just fire all of the workers.       

It would seem that we’ve already hit that “certain point”, and at least one fast-food restaurant is finding ways to get rid of people.

McDonald’s of Europe just purchased 7,000 computerized ordering kiosks, and this means they won’t have to pay cashiers.  Computerized ordering systems aren’t exactly new.  Chances are that you used online ordering yourself the last time you bought a pizza for delivery.

The only problem which remains is how to remove humans from the kitchen.  Well, actually, that problem has also already been solved.  An automated cooking-and-preparation machine which makes custom burgers has recently been unveiled by American company Momentum Machines.  Do you feel like having some coffee instead?  Yep.  That’s also already been automated.  But, we all knew this day was coming.  Automated coffee machines are also nothing new.

The problem, then, is not whether or not we want to have computer automated food preparation services in our society.  The problem is what happens with all of the people who are newly-unemployed or unemployable as a consequence of these changes.

The over-population in large cities and also in America broadly is one of the conditions which is making our working environments more strenuous and less gratifying.  Open-borders policies, pro-immigration lobbyists, and anti-white Americans full of “white privilege” lies are endangering America by failing to reject aggressive illegal immigration and the programs which support it.

The problem of over-population as a consequence of massive illegal immigration or other government immigration programs puts an incredible strain on the government, the private sector, and also upon the multitudes of social programs we use to help Americans.

Italian philosopher Julius Evola explains how this is a problem, and that it gives us other larger problems as well.

“Overpopulation exacerbates the problem of how to employ the workforces; it also unavoidably intensifies production processes, which in turn, due to their determinisms, strengthen the demonic nature of the economy.  The result is an increasing enslavement of the individual and the reduction of free space and of any autonomous movement in modern cities, swarming as though in putrefaction with faceless beings of ‘mass civilization.’  This is the most important aspect of the problem.”

Extreme demographic growth, as with cases of massive illegal immigration, can only destabilize a society. The rapid and extreme increase of people within a society strains and injures the capability of a State to properly care for all of its citizens.

It would be unfair for me to say that an extreme population change serves no purpose.  As Evola explains, the purposes it does fill are entirely unsavory and in opposition to a Traditional lifestyle.

“Politically speaking, the demographic explosion is doomed to create a congestion that in turn produces critical international solutions, resulting in wars that cannot be justified by any higher right or idea: here the mere quantity and condition of a ‘proletarian nation’ do not correspond to a right or an idea. … Aside from war, the population overload can only lead some countries to seek space among other peoples as an emigrating exportation of ‘cheap labor’ who are eventually destined to lose their identity and be scattered among other peoples.  As the congestion continues, the fatal effects will be inner crises and social tensions representing manna from heaven for the leaders of Marxist subversion.“[emphasis added]

I sympathize with the plight among under-paid workers and those who cannot live a comfortable life in spite of “working full time.”  I would hope to see the thousands upon thousands of fast-food workers able to enjoy Labor Day in a manner suitable for the sacrifices they make, but demanding higher pay from the parasitic capitalists whom employ them is not going to fix the problem.  Supposing that fast-food workers do win some kind of a mandate for $15.00 dollars per hour pay, that would be the death knell which would signal the end of most human services in fast-food.  Machines would almost certainly be cheaper at that point (unless, of course, we aren’t already there).

As Matt Heimbach has correctly (and frequently) pointed out, the numbers are never on our side.  He must have been channeling Evola when he said it, because it sounds eerily similar to the late philosopher when he said, “The power of numbers is the power of mere brute masses; this power is in itself very relative, because even herds need to be guided.”

Echoing German economist Werner Sombart, Evola agrees that over-population is a problem, but also that there is a solution.

“Sombart correctly saw that the decrease of population would have been one of the few ways of dealing a deathblow to high capitalism … without proceeding to disastrous modifications in every normal socioeconomic institution.”

Evola has not tried to give us a Modest Proposal, rather he is warning us that population growth cannot outstrip the capacities of our lands, our cities, and our government.

I sincerely hope that fast-food workers are able to make a better life for themselves in their present line of work, but their problem of low pay is symptomatic of the conditions caused by over-population and capitalist abuses of the people.  It is also a warning about the eventual death of a people in their own homelands should those conditions continue.

Until the day that we can have government sponsored forced-deportation and removal of foreigners from America, we should try to use lobbying as a means to our end.  In spite of some of their shortcomings, Numbers USA is one of the premier immigration control and pro-enforcement lobbying groups on the Internet.  Numbers USA, and groups like them, are a useful tool for telling politicians that we will not suffer to be run out of our own homes by swarms of foreigners.

We must reject illegal immigration and non-white immigration to America, and we must also reject capitalism and the denigrating work conditions it creates.  The future of our people in our own lands depends on it, and it’s all worth more than $15.00 dollars an hour.

 

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Fast Food and Low Wages: What’s it Got to do with Overpopulation? by Thomas Buhls is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.




  • Dustin

    What we’re seeing right now is the end of the American Experiment. It was easy to pretend that everybody’s equal in the 1700s or 1800s when there was still free land to give away, or in the 1900s when welfare state socialism still worked.

    But now we see that everyone is manifestly unequal, now that there is no free ticket into the middle class any longer.

    I and others like me are living proof that it is still possible to make it into the middle class through merit, if one has sufficient skill and intelligence. (That’s not unique in any way to the American Experiment, that’s been the case throughout all of human history.) The difference now however is that all those without those things are now going to have to go into the lower class. Which is going to be a giant shock for most of them since most of them had a free ticket into the middle class throughout most of American history even though they really didn’t deserve it.

    Also Tom, you’re forgetting that these masses are causing some (most?) of their own predicament wrt 3rd world mass immigration. They still think that the American Experiment is resurrectable if only they had more votes for more radical leftist proposals. That’s where the immigrants come in. It’s all about votes within the failed system of democracy. Of course it’s not going to work and it’s only going to backfire and make things even worse for people like themselves (and not, in fact, for people like us whom it’s aimed at).

    • KO

      Plentiful land here delayed the advent of the “Servile State” (Belloc) by a couple of hundred years compared to England. That’s what you have when the overwhelming majority do not own their own means of production. Rises in productivity have generated great wealth that has been widely dispersed, desite lack of ownership. That seems to be reversing. Many forces have diminished the relative incomes of working Americans, including feminism, immigration, globalism (including the willingness to enrich foreigners at the cost of Americans, see Saudi Arabia and China). Closing the borders, renegotiating trade treaties, reducing federal taxes and expenditures, and stopping the printing presses at the Fed are all relevant to reversing the decline of American standards of living.

    • KO

      There was broad consensus in the 70’s that stabilizing the population would preserve the good life in the U.S.A. Was it the Nixon-Ford-Carter deflation that ended that belief, which gave way to growth at any cost built on massive immigration? Then the environmentalists switched sides, and voted to go with the left coalition in favor of unlimited immigration instead of their tradition advocacy of limited population growth. Most of our population growth since 1970 can be traced to immigration, I believe. Most of the environmental degradation we have suffered has resulted from that grown in population. But the environmentalists abandoned the fight in support of bringing in dependent future Democratic voters.

  • Leslie H. Higgins

    Umm, again it should be remembered that we actually “vote” every time we spend our money. A supermarket in my area has some automated checkout lanes, but there are still cashiers because not everyone uses them. I can’t say I order pizza much, but I refuse to use an ATM.

    The potential absence of a human interface is a quality of life issue, so it would be nice if you stopped pretending humans do not have free will and encourage us to make responsible choices.

work-fare2

By: Thomas Buhls



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