Crypto-Tribalism: Folk and Faith in the Digital Age


Luddite Against the MachinePeter Sunde of The Pirate Bay has taken a clear stand in opposition to technical solutions to government oppression in a recent Wired interview, “You can’t beat politics with technology“. He’s in the eye of a seemingly technical and esoteric debate, but there’s more than meets the eye. Its resolution will dictate the boundaries of politics for future generations.

I disagree with him. You absolutely can beat politics with technology, and we have succeeded at doing so time and time again. Technology, not political lobbying, broke the music industry’s monopolistic cartel. Technology is what allowed Arktos, Counter-Currents, and others to break Radical Traditionalism out of the samizdat ghetto that Western politics had relegated it to. Technology is what empowered nearly everybody reading this to break out of the Matrix of Modern system politics in the first place.

We can engage in politics to discourage system politicians from persecuting us, but that always will be and can only be of secondary importance, a rear-guard action while the primary energy is invested in developing systems which are integrally immune to state oppression. Contrary to what Sunde would have one believe, public key encryption technology truly does empower us to communicate and conspire without government interference. There’s still important work to be done in realizing its full potential beyond the geek and hacker communities, but there are no impediments to that development.

Just as few realized the explosive potential of the humble “hyperlink”, few currently realize just how consequential it is that we’re rapidly approaching an age when communication, conspiracy, and currency are all beyond the reach of the System. The Crypto-Anarchist community gets it, but their limited understanding of politics and human nature naturally compels them to see “anarchy” following the victory over this reigning authority. Completely ignorant of the Authority which preceded the power structures at the service of global finance capitalism, they can be forgiven for this error.

Peter Sunde, Co-Founder of The Pirate Bay

Peter Sunde, Co-Founder of The Pirate Bay

There will be no abyss of anarchy in a world where the state’s no longer capable of controlling its minions in the way it currently does. Human behavior will be regulated by the bonds of family and community, by religious authority, and by the fixed constraints on humanity which nature and instinct put in place. Humans are intrinsically tribal and traditional, a fact which will be made manifest as this anti-tribal and anti-traditional regime is weakened. The welfare state and its socioeconomic framework allows and encourages men and women to think of themselves as atomized individual atheist islands, an illusion which cannot survive outside this Matrix.

When the Internet first emerged, there was an assumption that since the protocol was intrinsically global and anti-hierarchical, that it would necessarily have a globalist and anti-hierarchical political impact. The very Leftists who at first championed the Information Revolution and the spread of ideas are increasingly subject to a bunker mentality regarding the Internet, carefully monitoring any and all feedback and pining for the good old days before the Internet empowered all those pesky regressive bloggers and commenters to promote ideas they had successfully purged from public discourse.

I’ve been a Bitcoin evangelist for years. Regretfully, few in our movement grasp just how pivotal the capacity to convert political power and influence into a regime-resistant form will prove to be in the grand scheme of things. While the capacity to transmit ideas is a critical first step, the capacity to invest in those ideas is the necessary next step in translating them into temporal threats to the prevailing political order. As our enemies know all too well, currency is power in liquid form. With Bitcoin and related technologies, we now have the capacity to exercise power beyond their reach.

As pivotal as Sunde’s Pirate Bay was in bringing about the first wave of resistance to the political order, his decisions and actions are relegating it along with Napster and Silk Road to a first generation of threats to this regime which failed for one reason or another (never due to a failure of the algorithms) to actualize their revolutionary potential. This is to be expected, as the men and women stumbling into the Crypto-Tribal Age can’t be expected to realize how their work fits into an overarching meta-political mega-trend.

We don’t need a constitutional First Amendment, because encrypted communication guarantees that for us. We don’t need a constitutional Second Amendment, because the successor to Silk Road will guarantee that for us. We don’t need to End the Fed, because massively distributed crypto-currencies will subvert the Federal Reserve by providing superior alternatives for storing and transmitting wealth. I’m not opposed, per se, to fighting for our liberties within this System, but the real struggle is for liberation from this System.

Sunde fails to grasp this, failing to grasp just how revolutionary his Pirate Bay project was. He regrets failing to shut down Pirate Bay on its tenth anniversary, and is working on some stupid centralized communication project which will require us to trust him and his servers with our private communication. The fatal problem with the Pirate Bay is exactly that, its entrusting Sunde to stewardship of the System. Data encryption and the advent of massively distributed algorithms empower us all to have systems which aren’t dependent on Peter Sunde, Ben Bernanke, Mark Zuckerberg, or Larry Summers. Humanity will no longer be hostage to these “experts” and their whims.

Our global technocratic elites will soon be relieved of the whip hand. It’s difficult to state how important this development is. It’s the foundation of an entirely new global political order superseding the Marxism, Fascism, and Liberalism Alexander Dugin and other New Right intellectuals have identified. It’s too early to predict precisely how it will play out, but the most likely mega-trend is that those political forces which are capable of exerting influence and control without military technology or financial manipulation will be ascendant. Those include the more hierarchical churches, the aristocracies, the traditional fraternities, and, most importantly, the local paragons and familial matriarchs and patriarchs.


  • Matt,

    How do I get money into Bitcoin now? After the Silk road thing, Dwolla won’t let me transfer money to bitcoin.

    • Matt Parrott

      I’ve heard good things about CampBX.

      I stick with the shady over-the-counter chat room exchanges, and haven’t actually been in a position to trade for several months. So I’m not really the best person to ask.

  • Lew

    There are indications the internet might fracture and break apart as the rest of the world builds its own network/infrastructure to get out from under the NSA. This could complicate things.

    • Matt Parrott

      The Internet is perhaps the most anti-fragile contraption ever designed.

      The foreign deep state communities have been itching for years to challenge America and Israel’s domination of the Internet, and this NSA boondoggle has probably given them the framing they need to sell the large-scale investment to their legislatures.

      This will probably play out as a scramble even deeper down the rabbit hole to better and cheaper Internet service for all. Since it’s highly doubtful that the foreign competitors can actually achieve walled gardens for Internet users and are unlikely to develop superior services, they’ll probably be relegated to competing with existing infrastructure by offering infrastructure which is cheaper and more open.

      For instance, they probably can’t out-compete Facebook and Google Plus, but they could offer an alternative which is massively distributed architecturally, open source, and ad-free. They can’t create anything better than Skype, but they could dish something up which offers end-to-end encryption, for instance.

      If *they* can’t have the NSA’s funhouse circus of backdoors on everything, they can rain on the NSA’s parade by investing in secure and open alternatives for people.

  • John Maelstrom

    You know I disagree with Bitcoin being the solution to our woes based on its artificially limited supply, but the encryption technology and smartphone usage certainly is. I’m curious about this statement though . . .

    “Data encryption and the advent of massively distributed algorithms empower us all to have systems which aren’t dependent on Peter Sunde, Ben Bernanke, Mark Zuckerberg, or Larry Summers. Humanity will no longer be hostage to these “experts” and their whims.”

    While I want those characters out of the picture in more ways than one, should there not be some expert – someone on our side – regulating the supply of currency? The “mining” that occurs in the Bitcoin realm demands the currency behave as a commodity when the healthier option is to have the currency behave as a public utility – our utility, a reward for our energy usage, and a motivator for where that energy is aimed.

    One of these days you have to do an article departing from the theory TYN articles usually focus on and instead give us an “Encryption for Dummies” intro.

    • Matt Parrott

      John,

      While I want those characters out of the picture in more ways than one, should there not be some expert – someone on our side – regulating the supply of currency?

      Ideally, a noble steward or elite would control currency and ensure its fair distribution. Achieving that is virtually impossible for us, given that the oligarchs in control of that hill have invested a good share of their wealth in fortifying their position.

      You see this situation in a microcosm quite frequently in the corporate world. Google can’t actually seize Microsoft’s Office profit stream, but they can throw out a free alternative so that nobody has a profit stream. Google did the same thing with iOS by throwing out Android for free with open source. Eventually Venezuela or Iran or some other major geopolitical opponent of the Western capitalist cartel will leverage the potential of cryptocurrencies to achieve that exact goal.

      The “mining” that occurs in the Bitcoin realm demands the currency behave as a commodity when the healthier option is to have the currency behave as a public utility – our utility, a reward for our energy usage, and a motivator for where that energy is aimed.

      I don’t know if Bitcoin’s the last word in cryptocurrency technology. Ultimately, my suspicion is that a tor-like darknet which has a cryptocurrency baked into the protocol will be the final answer. Time will tell.

      Personally, I like the deflationary “commodity” model, and see it as a feature. Without it, you wouldn’t have the potential for a domino effect as a global scramble the likes of which we’ve never seen ensues. I know I sound preposterous when I claim that, but I have no choice but to be preposterous until somebody points out where I’ve made a misstep in my reasoning.

      One of these days you have to do an article departing from the theory TYN articles usually focus on and instead give us an “Encryption for Dummies” intro.

      I’ve been intending to do that. My “Security Culture” work will be out within the next week or so.

    • Lew

      One of the many aspects of BC I do not understand is how the fixed supply can be an advantage for anyone but the global super elite. Conceptually, it seems like it would lead to total control of the money by the elite, except with even less, drastically less, regulatory restraints than they face now.

  • Classic Sparkle

    I disagree with him. You absolutely can beat politics with technology, and we have succeeded at doing so time and time again.

    Matt…. Our dismal situation belies your assertion. If we ever won it was a tiny battle in a large war. Things get worse. Period.

    Doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try but c’mon.

    As far as bitcoin. Doesn’t one convert DOLLARS into bitcoins? And the people that are trying to leverage… Aren’t they trying to make DOLLARS off of bitcoin? Or am I missing something?

    It’s handy for doing shit I like to do (like buying cheap pharmaceuticals that happen to be schedule 1 controlled substances in this country) on the sly but that seems to be the extent of its usefulness right now.

    • Matt Parrott

      Our dismal situation belies your assertion.

      How dismal is our situation, really? Who would have guessed 15 years ago that a vibrant subculture would be emerging with an interest in identitarian and traditional ideals? Our media is more free than it’s ever been, our access and outreach is phenomenal relative to our admittedly dire demographic and conventional political plight.

      The point I was making was a more general one about technological solutions solving political problems quite often. They’ve even been solving a great deal of our problems over here in our lonely little dissident movement. Not enough, perhaps, but enough to prove the overarching point.

      Doesn’t one convert DOLLARS into bitcoins? […] ? Or am I missing something?

      Foreign currency, services performed, commodities, and massive bricks of your controlled substances can all be exchanged for BTC. Dollars are merely one thing of value among many which can be traded for Bitcoins. With the proliferation of smartphones, it’s likely that more gray and black markets could follow Silk Road in relying on BTC as the preferred currency. The dollar still dominates our economy, to the point where even gold itself supposedly goes up and down in value relative to the dollar…rather than vice-versa, but that could change.

  • Goldberry

    Technology and this freedom of information is likely our most important asset. Considering we believe in the truth of our positions. Thank god we don’t live in the time when all there was for information was a couple networks and the local paper. Im shamefully ignorant when it comes to finance and technology. Please keep enlightening me. Thanks Matt,so interesting!

  • Leslie H. Higgins

    The number of people whom our message has touched is relatively tiny. But you are wholly ignoring the degeneracy technology and secrecy have allowed to flourish. One in four searches is for pornography, and the proportion for downloads is higher. Technology is inherently anti-tradition and anti-family, and the injury it does to to the natural family can only be compared to the damage the automobile wrought with its unnatural increase in mobility and making moving far from family practical.

    Given the effects of pornography on family disintegration, it is a mystery how you think technology could ever be our ally, fundamentally speaking. It’s great that some people have discovered traditionalism: but for every one of us, there are probably twenty average joes whose intelligence has been still further blunted by those ubiquitous humor websites.

    I grant this: the ‘Net fosters heterodox views of every stripe. But even if the political culture changed, and a traditionalist regime came into power, what could we do to reinvigorate society and weaken bourgeois individualism without heavy Internet censorship? The regime would be powerless to ensure the public welfare; and however many of the best and brightest we touched with our noble ideals, how could they set the tone of the culture? The bottom 9/10ths will never be able to pull themselves from technology-enabled vulgarities without regulation from above.

    Sunde is right. He identifies as a Left-wing socialist, but in his refusal to be an anarchist he sounds like a social nationalist, and I am astonished that you seem to conscience making all government impossible in the future simply because you despise our “System”.

    • Matt Parrott

      Given the effects of pornography on family disintegration, it is a mystery how you think technology could ever be our ally

      While the web definitely does put a novel twist to things, sexual degeneracy readily found its expression before the web and plenty of traditionalist subcultures are successfully navigating this challenge.

      But even if the political culture changed, and a traditionalist regime came into power, what could we do to reinvigorate society and weaken bourgeois individualism without heavy Internet censorship?

      Our system defeats ideas by promoting, funding, and encouraging superior ones. Essentially, it seems that you’re proposing that we evade decadence, like the Amish, rather than confronting it and defeating it. We need to develop a culture and system which is immune to these ideas and influences, not quarantined from them.

      The bottom 9/10ths will never be able to pull themselves from technology-enabled vulgarities without regulation from above.

      Without a culture of decadent individualism, the right kinds of herd dynamics and social anxieties do what God put them there to do.

      I am astonished that you seem to conscience making all government impossible in the future simply because you despise our “System”.

      Technological progress isn’t going to preclude government, merely censorship and monetary manipulation. There was government long before media censorship and monetary manipulation, and there will be government afterwards.

    • Leslie H. Higgins

      Thank you for the responses, which I find very thoughtful. “Without a culture of decadent individualism, the right kinds of herd dynamics and social anxieties do what God put them there to do,” is certainly the best answer to the question that I have heard.

      The only things I can pick at are the idea that government predates censorship; certainly there was not always a “media,” but it is hard to imagine the most primitive tribe without some precursor to censorship.

      Other than that, while their approach has been nitpicked frequently, I tend to think the Amish and other Mennonites do confront modernity in an appropriate way, albeit one for which I and most other moderns lack the resolve (but hey, I am asking for an old-fashioned Amish-Mennonite made night shirt for Christmas–handmade by White, rural Americans). As it stands, they are one of the fastest growing populations in the United States, and even in my northeastern, liberal hometown we have benefitted from occasional Mennonite singing groups visiting.

    • Leslie H. Higgins

      Link for the clothes was

      http://www.plainlydressed.com/

Luddite Against the Machine

By: Matt Parrott


Matt is a founding member of TradYouth and is currently the project's Chief Information Officer. He's been active in the White Identity cause for years, primarily as a blogger but also as a street activist and regional organizer.
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